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Electronic Filing of Tax Returns Sees Increase in Theft

With the number of federal income tax returns filed electronically increasing each year, criminals are becoming more organized as they look for ways to steal the identity of taxpayers and then use those identifies to take the tax refunds the individuals are owed. (more…)

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Hawaii IRS Tax Settlement Options

Hawaiian taxpayers can use a variety of Internal Revenue Service tax settlement options to repay their outstanding tax debt. Some tax settlement options will allow the taxpayer to pay much less than the full amount of money owed. The IRS wants to help taxpayers meet their tax obligations and will often accept an IRS tax settlement offer if it will help taxpayers pay all of their future tax obligations.

The IRS has been given the authority from the federal government to collect outstanding IRS tax debt. The IRS also has the ability to use very aggressive collection tactics such as wage garnishment, bank account levies and property repossession if Hawaiian taxpayers fail to pay their tax debt. All Hawaiian taxpayers who have outstanding tax debt will want to discuss the IRS tax settlement options with a tax professional.

Offer in Compromise

Although Offer in Compromise (OIC) is one of the most common settlement options it also can be one of the most difficult to qualify for. An OIC allows the Hawaiian taxpayer to make an offer to the IRS and if the IRS accepts the offer, the taxpayer may be able to settle IRS tax debt for a fraction of the total amount of tax debt owed. To qualify for an OIC, the Hawaiian taxpayer must meet stringent OIC requirements and convince the IRS that the amount of their offer is greater than or equal to the total amount tax the IRS could collect through aggressive collection actions.

The IRS will not accept all OIC offers and if they deny an offer, the IRS can use the detailed information they have gathered to continue collections. Penalties and interest will continue to collect on all outstanding IRS tax debt until the OIC is accepted. All Hawaiian taxpayers who are considering Offer in Compromise should contact a tax professional for more information.

Qualifying for Offer in Compromise

Hawaiian taxpayers must meet one of the following requirements to qualify for Offer in Compromise:

  • Doubt as to Liability- There must be a legitimate question about the amount of tax debt owed by Hawaiian taxpayers for the IRS to grant an OIC under this condition. This condition is not frequently met.
  • Doubt as to Collectibility- The amount of tax debt is not in question only the ability of the IRS to collect the federal taxes before the statutory period of time expires.
  • Effective Tax Administration- Hawaiian taxpayers who can not pay their federal tax debt with out suffering a hardship which would be inequitable or unreasonable may qualify for an Offer in Compromise. This condition is most frequently used for handicapped or elderly individuals.

The following tasks must also be completed by Hawaiian taxpayers:

  • Hawaiian taxpayers must pay all federal tax debt on or before the federal deadline for the next five years.
  • Hawaiian taxpayers must meet all of the requirements outlined in the Offer in Compromise.
  • Hawaiian taxpayers must complete and submit all federal tax returns to the IRS by the federal tax deadline.

Installment Agreements

Installment agreements are the most common type of IRS tax settlement option. An installment agreement allows the Hawaiian taxpayer to pay their back taxes in monthly installment payments. The taxpayer will be required to pay all their tax debt in a specific time period which can vary based on the total amount of outstanding tax debt owed.

The IRS will generally accept an installment agreement if the taxpayers owes $25,000 or less. If the Hawaiian taxpayer owes more than $25,000 they will want to consult with a tax professional who can help negotiate an installment agreement. Penalties and interest will continue to accrue until the full amount of tax debt is paid. It is always less costly to make a lump sum payment for the full amount of IRS tax debt.

The IRS has the authority to deny or cancel an installment agreement if any of the following occurs:

  • If the Hawaiian taxpayer does not pay their monthly installment payments or pays less than the full amount due. First time violators may be given a thirty to sixty day grace period.
  • If the Hawaiian taxpayer fails to submit their federal tax returns each year.
  • The financial status of the Hawaiian taxpayer substantially improves.
  • The Hawaiian taxpayer provides incorrect financial data to the IRS when applying for the installment agreement.
  • Hawaiian taxpayers who are self-employed must file federal tax returns each quarter and make their quarterly tax payments.
  • If the Hawaiian taxpayer does not pay all of their tax debt for the five years before the IRS debt which can not be paid.
  • If the Hawaiian taxpayers has had another installment agreement within the last 5 years.

Partial Payment Installment Agreement

Hawaiian taxpayers who are unable to make the minimum payment with an installment agreement may qualify for a partial payment installment agreement or PPIA. The PPIA will allow the Hawaiian taxpayer to pay less than the full amount owed to the IRS for a specific time period. The PPIA can be less expensive, time consuming and less complicated than an Offer in Compromise.

Unfortunately, interest and penalties will continue to collect on the outstanding tax debt until the debt is completely paid. The IRS will cease collection actions under a PPIA but will review the financial status of the taxpayer every 2 years to determine if the PPIA can be modified for cancelled.

Currently Not Collectible

The IRS may decide that some debt can not be collected. If the IRS makes this determination about a Hawaiian taxpayer’s IRS tax debt the status will be changed to currently not collectible. If a taxpayer’s debt is determined currently not collectible, the Internal Revenue Service will stop all collections against the taxpayer.  If the IRS can not collect the debt within ten years the debt will be forgiven.

Interest and penalties will continue to accumulate on the outstanding tax debt even under the currently not collectible status. The Internal Revenue Service will send written notification each year to the Hawaiian taxpayer outlining the amount of taxes owed. This notice is not considered a tax bill.

Penalty Abatement

Penalty abatement allows the IRS to eliminate part or all of the penalties assessed against taxpayers. The IRS assesses penalties for a variety of reasons including: failing to file a federal tax return, providing inaccurate tax information or requesting a false refund.

The IRS will, under certain conditions, abate or lower penalties against Hawaiian taxpayers. Valid reasons might include: receiving incorrect advice from a tax professional, or failing mental or physical health. The may be certain penalties which the IRS will not lower or abate.

IRS Tax Settlement Options For Kentucky Taxpayers

Kentucky taxpayers who want to settle IRS tax debt may be able to use an IRS tax settlement option. The United States federal government has given the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) the legal authority to collect federal taxes for a fraction of the full amount owed.

Kentucky taxpayers who fail to pay IRS tax debt may face wage garnishments, repossessions or bank account levies. IRS tax settlement options may allow a taxpayer to repay their debt and avoid debt collection. The Internal Revenue Service may be willing to negotiate with a Kentucky taxpayer to avoid declaring debt currently not collectible or agreeing to a protracted installment agreement.

Kentucky taxpayers who need information about IRS tax settlement options can contact a tax professional such as an enrolled agent, certified public accountant or tax attorney.

Offer in Compromise

Offer in Compromise is one type of IRS tax settlement option available for Kentucky taxpayers. Kentucky taxpayers can make an “offer” to the Internal Revenue Service to settle their IRS tax debt. If the Internal Revenue Service agrees to the compromise amount and all of the requirements of the Offer in Compromise are met, the federal tax debt will be considered settled. Under certain conditions, the Internal Revenue Service may be willing to accept less than the total amount of federal tax owed.

Approximately 80% of first time Offer in Compromises are declined by the Internal Revenue Service. The IRS may be willing to continue negotiations with Kentucky taxpayers to find an amount which is agreeable to the federal government and the taxpayer. Offer in Compromise can be time consuming, expensive and complicated. The IRS will request a substantial amount of financial data to process the Offer in Compromise agreement and if the OIC is denied, the Internal Revenue Service can use this information to continue their debt collection efforts.

Qualifying for Offer in Compromise

Not all Kentucky taxpayers with IRS tax debt will be able to qualify for an Offer in Compromise. Offer in Compromise may be accepted by the Internal Revenue Service for the following reasons:

  • Doubt as to Liability- Kentucky residents may have questions about the amount of tax liability they have been assessed. If the IRS agrees, they may be willing to grant an Offer in Compromise. This condition is not frequently met.
  • Doubt as to Collectibility- The Internal Revenue Service may accept an Offer in Compromise if they believe they will not be able to collect federal tax debt. This is not the same as the first condition in that the amount of tax debt owed is not in question, only the ability of the IRS to collect the tax debt.
  • Effective Tax Administration- Kentucky taxpayers who believe they will experience “an economic hardship which is unfair and inequitable” if they pay their IRS tax debt may qualify for an Offer in Compromise. This condition is most frequently met for the elderly and the handicapped.

Kentucky taxpayers applying for an OIC must also complete the following:

  • Kentucky taxpayers will have to pay all of their future IRS tax debt on or before the federal tax deadline for the next 5 years.
  • All the Offer in Compromise requirements must be completed by the Kentucky taxpayer.
  • Kentucky taxpayers must fill out and complete all of their Internal Revenue Service tax returns by the federal tax deadline.

Installment Agreement

The most popular method used by taxpayers to settle IRS tax debt is the installment agreement. With an Installment Agreement or IA the IRS can make monthly installment payments to repay federal tax debt. Kentucky taxpayers with tax debt of $25,000 or less can generally get an installment agreement and repay their debt over 60 months. Kentucky taxpayers who owe more than $25,000 should talk to a tax professional that has the expertise to negotiate the best installment agreement possible. Penalties and interest will accrue for the entire duration of the installment agreement. Paying all federal tax debt in one lump sum is always less expensive than an installment agreement.

The Internal Revenue Service can revoke an installment agreement for any of the following reasons:

  • If the Kentucky taxpayer fails to pay the monthly tax payments or file tax returns.
  • If the Kentucky taxpayer pays less than the agreed upon monthly payment amount.  First time violators may be granted a 30-60 day grace period.
  • If a Kentucky taxpayer’s financial condition improves.
  • If a Kentucky taxpayer provides false or inaccurate tax information to the IRS during the installment agreement application process.

Kentucky taxpayers who are considering an installment agreement must meet the following requirements:

  • All self-employed Kentucky taxpayers must file quarterly IRS tax returns and make quarterly estimated federal tax payments.
  • Kentucky taxpayers must submit all federal tax returns.
  • Kentucky taxpayers must pay their IRS tax debt for the 5 years before the tax liability which can not be paid.
  • Kentucky taxpayers can not have made another installment agreement with the Internal Revenue Service with in the last 5 years.
  • The IRS will perform a review of the Kentucky taxpayer’s financial situation every two years.

Partial Payment Installment Agreement

Kentucky taxpayers who do not qualify for an Offer in Compromise or who can not pay their full amount of tax debt may be able use a partial payment installment agreement or PPIA. Partial payment installment agreements differ from an installment agreement by allowing the Kentucky taxpayer to repay their tax debt with partial monthly payments. Any debt which is not paid will be forgiven by the IRS.

Partial payment installment agreements can be less complicated, less expensive and less time consuming that an OIC agreement. Penalties and interest will continue to accrue during the PPIA period, but the IRS will stop their collection actions such as wage garnishments and bank account levies. The partial payment installment agreement will be reviewed by the Internal Revenue Service every two years and if the Kentucky taxpayer’s financial situation improves the PPIA payments may be increased or the plan may be terminated. It is always more cost effective to pay all IRS tax debt with one lump sum payment.

Currently Not Collectible

Tax debt not paid by the Kentucky taxpayer may be determined “currently not collectible”. Currently not collectible will stop all Internal Revenue Service collection tactics such as tax levies and wage garnishments. Notice will be sent each year to the Kentucky taxpayer outlining tax debt owed. This notice is not considered a tax bill. The expiration for the Internal Revenue Service to try and collect the tax debt is ten years.

Penalty Abatement

The Internal Revenue Service may assess the Kentucky taxpayer penalties for a variety of tax infractions including but not limited to: failure to file a federal tax return, requesting a false refund or reporting inaccurate tax data. The Internal Revenue Service may be willing to abate or reduce a tax penalty if the Kentucky taxpayer can provide a valid reason for the abatement. Valid reasons may include: personal duress, environmental disasters, inaccurate tax professional filings or failing physical health. The Internal Revenue Service may not be willing to dismiss or lower all penalties.

IRS Tax Settlement Options In Iowa

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has been given the authority by the federal government not only to collect taxes to fund government activities, but if necessary, to settle federal tax debt for less than the full amount owed. The IRS may be willing to negotiate a tax settlement if they believe the negotiations will allow the Iowa taxpayer to meet all future tax liability. Iowa taxpayers who owe IRS back taxes may have tax settlement options to eliminate the aggressive tactics of the IRS.

Iowa taxpayers who are interested in an IRS tax settlement option can contact a tax professional such as an enrolled agent, certified public accountant or tax attorney.

Offer in Compromise

Offer in Compromise or OIC is used by many Iowa taxpayers to settle IRS tax debt. Offer in Compromise allows the Iowa taxpayer to make an offer to the IRS for generally less than the full amount owed. If the IRS accepts the offer, it is considered a compromise settlement and the amount outlined in the OIC will be settled. Penalties and interest continue to accrue until the OIC is accepted.

The Internal Revenue Service will not accept all offers. Negotiations and appeals may be necessary to help all parties find an OIC amount which is acceptable. Offer in Compromise can be complicated and expensive. The IRS may request large amounts of detailed financial data which can be used to continue debt collection if the Offer in Compromise offer is denied. Offer in Compromise is one of several IRS tax settlement options and it may not be the best option for all Iowa taxpayers.

Qualifying for Offer in Compromise

Iowa taxpayers must prove one of the following conditions for the IRS to consider accepting the Offer in Compromise offer:

• Doubt as to Liability- This condition assumes there might be a discrepancy in the amount of debt calculated. This can occur if the IRS made a calculation error or if the taxpayer has new information concerning their debt. This condition is seldom used.

• Doubt as to Collectibility- Under this condition there is not a question about the amount of tax debt owed, only the ability of the IRS to collect the debt.

• Effective Tax Administration- If an Iowa taxpayer can prove that paying their tax debt could cause “an economic hardship which is unfair and inequitable” they may qualify for an Offer in Compromise. The elderly and handicapped most frequently meet this condition.

Iowa taxpayers applying for an Offer in Compromise must also complete the following:

• Iowa taxpayers must pay all of their IRS tax debt on or before the federal tax deadline for the next 5 years.

• All Offer in Compromise requirements must be paid by the Iowa taxpayer.

• Iowa taxpayers must submit all of their Internal Revenue Service tax returns on or by the federal tax deadline.

Installment Agreement

Iowa taxpayers who do not qualify for an Offer in Compromise or who want an IRS tax settlement plan which is less time consuming or less expensive can use an installment agreement. With an installment agreement, the Iowa taxpayer makes monthly installment payments to repay all of their tax debt. Iowa taxpayers who owe $25,000 or less in tax liability may be able to use an installment agreement to pay their outstanding tax debt within 60 months. Iowa taxpayers who owe more than $25,000 should contact a tax professional to discuss the best option for settling their IRS debt. The IRS will stop their collection efforts during the installment agreement, but interest and penalties will continue to accrue. To reduce the amount of taxes paid, it is always best to pay all tax debt in one lump sum payment.

The IRS can revoke an installment agreement (IA) for any of the following reasons:

• The Iowa taxpayer fails to make all of their monthly tax payments.

• The Iowa taxpayer does not file their tax returns.

• The Iowa taxpayer pays less than the required monthly payment amount. The IRS may give first time violators 30-60 days to make payments.

• The Iowa taxpayer’s financial condition substantially improves.

• False or inaccurate financial information was provided to the Internal Revenue Service by the Iowa taxpayer during the installment agreement application process.

Iowa taxpayers who are applying for an IA must meet all of the following requirements:

• All self-employed Iowa taxpayers must file quarterly federal tax returns and make quarterly tax payments.

• Iowa taxpayers must submit all of their federal tax returns.

• Iowa taxpayers must pay their federal tax debt for the 5 years before the tax liability which can not be paid.

• Iowa taxpayers can not have made another installment agreement with the Internal Revenue Service within the last 5 years.

• The Internal Revenue Service will review the Iowa taxpayer’s financial situation every 2 years.

Partial Payment Installment Agreement

Another popular method to settle IRS tax debt is the partial payment installment agreement (PPIA). The PPIA allows Iowa taxpayers who can not pay all of their IRS debt to make partial monthly installment payments. If the IRS accepts the PPIA plan, all debt not paid will be forgiven. Many Iowa taxpayers choose the PPIA over the Offer in Compromise because it can be less complicated, less expensive and less time consuming.

One benefit of the PPIA is that the IRS will cease all collection efforts including: wage garnishment, bank levies, and repossessions. Penalties and interest will continue to accrue during the payment period. The partial payment installment agreement will be reviewed every two years by the IRS to determine if the taxpayer’s financial situation has changed. The IRS may increase the Iowa taxpayer’s monthly payments or completely cancel the PPIA.

Currently Not Collectible

If the IRS determines that an Iowa taxpayer’s debt is not collectible they may change the debt status to “currently not collectible”. Under this status, debt collection efforts will cease. The IRS will send written notification each year to the Iowa taxpayer detailing the amount of tax debt owed. This notification is not considered a tax bill. If the IRS fails to collect the debt within 10 years, the collection time will expire and the IRS tax debt will be forgiven.

Penalty Abatement

The IRS may fine tax penalties to an Iowa taxpayer for a series of tax infractions including: not filing a tax returning, reporting incorrect tax data, or requesting a false refund. There may be a valid reason for the error and if this is the case, the IRS may be willing to reduce or eliminate the penalty. Valid reasons could include: false information from a tax professional, deteriorating mental or physical health, or natural disasters. The IRS may not be willing to lower or dismiss all penalties. A tax professional can help evaluate penalties and negotiate penalty abatement with the IRS.

Maine IRS Tax Settlement Options

There are a variety of IRS tax settlement options available for Maine taxpayers who have outstanding federal tax debt and if the taxpayer uses one of these programs, the IRS may be willing to except far less than the total amount owed. The IRS believes that Maine taxpayers who can eliminate back tax debt are far more likely to be able to meet all future tax obligations.

The IRS has the authority to collect all outstanding tax debt. If Maine taxpayers fail to pay their debt they could become the target of aggressive IRS tax collection efforts. The IRS is authorized to use wage garnishments, property repossession, and bank levies to force Maine taxpayers to pay outstanding taxes. All Maine residents who are facing harassment by the IRS or who would like more information about available tax settlement options can contact a tax professional for help.

Offer in Compromise

Offer in Compromise or OIC is one of the most common IRS tax settlement options available for taxpayers. Maine taxpayers can use Offer in Compromise to make an offer to the Internal Revenue Service to settle IRS tax debt. The IRS can agree to the settlement amount or they can reject the offer. If the Internal Revenue Service accepts the OIC and the Maine taxpayer fulfills the requirements of the agreement, the tax debt will be considered settled.

The IRS will not accept all Offer in Compromise offers, in fact, they may deny up to 80% of all initial offers. Maine taxpayers may be able to negotiate with the IRS or make a formal appeal. The OIC will stop all collection actions by the IRS, but interest and penalties will continue to accumulate until the OIC is accepted.

Offer in Compromise may be time consuming, expensive and difficult to implement. Large amounts of detailed information may be requested by the IRS. If the IRS denies the OIC offer they can use the information they have collected to continue their collection efforts. Offer in Compromise is only one of several IRS tax settlement options available, and it may not be the best one for all Maine taxpayers.

Qualifying for Offer in Compromise

Maine taxpayers must meet one of the following requirements to qualify for an Offer in Compromise:

  • Doubt as to Liability- The IRS may accept an OIC offer if they believe the debt assessed may be incorrect. This can occur through a miscalculation or if the taxpayer has additional tax information to offer the IRS. This condition is not frequently used.
  • Doubt as to Collectibility- The IRS may accept an OIC offer if they believe they may not be able to collect the IRS tax debt either now or in the future. The IRS may also believe collecting the tax debt will be too expensive.
  • Effective Tax Administration- Certain Maine taxpayers who are unable to pay their tax debt because it could cause a “hardship which is inequitable or unfair” may qualify for an Offer in Compromise. The handicapped and elderly most frequently qualify under this condition.

The following tasks will also need to be completed for an Offer in Compromise:

  • All federal tax debt must be pay before the federal deadline for the next 5 years.
  • All of the requirements outlined in the OIC must be completed.
  • All tax returns must be completed and submitted to the IRS by the federal tax deadline.

Installment Agreement

An installment agreement is another tax settlement option available for Maine taxpayers to settle IRS tax debt. An installment agreement allows the taxpayer to pay the full amount of tax debt they owe monthly. For Maine taxpayers who owe $25,000 or less, it is generally not too difficult to qualify for an installment agreement but the tax debt must be paid within 60 months.

Maine taxpayers who have IRS tax debt exceeding $25,000 should contact a tax professional for help negotiating a favorable installment agreement. An installment agreement will not stop penalties and interest from accruing, but it will stop the IRS from trying to collect the tax debt. It is always less expensive to pay IRS tax debt as soon as possible without a protracted installment agreement.  The IRS reviews installment agreements every two years and can cancel the installment agreement for any of the following reasons:

  • Failing to pay the monthly installment payments.
  • Failing to submit federal tax returns each year.
  • Failing to pay the full amount of taxes due each month. First time violators may be granted a 30-60 day grace period.
  • The financial situation of the Maine taxpayer substantially improves.
  • Failing to provide correct financial information to the IRS when applying for the installment agreement.

The following tasks must also be completed:

  • Self-employed Maine taxpayers must file and pay quarterly tax payments.
  • Maine taxpayers must file federal tax returns each year.
  • Maine taxpayers must pay all federal taxes for the 5 years before the IRS debt which can not be paid.
  • Maine taxpayers can not have had another installment agreement with in the last five years.

Partial Payment Installment Agreement

Maine taxpayers who do not qualify for an OIC or who can not pay their full debt with an installment agreement may be able to settle their IRS tax debt with a partial payment installment agreement or PPIA. The PPIA allows Maine taxpayers to make partial monthly installment payments. The IRS will forgive the amount which is not paid under the PPIA. The PPIA can also be less difficult, less expensive and less time consuming to implement than an OIC.

Partial payment installment agreements will not stop interest and penalties from accruing on outstanding tax debt. The PPIA will be reviewed every 2 years by the IRS and can be modified or cancelled if the IRS believes the taxpayers finances have improved.

Currently Not Collectible

Certain Maine taxpayers will not be able to pay their tax debt for a variety of reasons. If the IRS agrees, they may change the status of their tax debt to “currently not collectible”. The currently not collectible status will not stop penalties and interest from accumulating, but it will stop the IRS from attempting to collect the tax debt.

The IRS will send written notification to Maine taxpayers each year outlining the amount of tax debt which is considered currently not collectible. This notice is not a tax bill. The Internal Revenue Service has ten years to collect all outstanding tax debt before the statute of limitations expires and the debt is forgiven.

Penalty Abatement

Penalties may be charged against Maine taxpayer for failing to report their financial information accurately, failing to file a tax return or requesting a false refund. The IRS may be willing to abate or lower penalties they have assessed against Maine taxpayers for certain reasons. Personal duress, health conditions, natural disasters or poor tax advice may all qualify as valid reasons. The IRS may not be willing to abate all penalties.

Kansas IRS Tax Settlement Options

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has created a variety of programs Kansas residents can use to settle federal tax debt. The United States federal government has given the IRS the authority to collect taxes and if necessary, to settle tax debt with taxpayers at a fraction of the total amount of debt owed. The Internal Revenue Service may be willing to settle debt to avoid declaring the debt currently not collectible or delaying payment of the IRS debt with a protracted installment agreement.

Kansas taxpayers who are considering a tax settlement option may want to contact a tax professional such as a tax attorney, enrolled agent or certified public accountant who understands the pros and cons of each plan and can help the Kansas taxpayer determine the best option.

Offer in Compromise

Kansas taxpayers may be able to use Offer in Compromise to settle their tax debt for a fraction of the total amount. Offer in Compromise allows Kansas taxpayers to make an “offer” to the IRS. The offer may be accepted or rejected. If the IRS considers the offer reasonable, it will accept the “compromise” and all taxes outlined in the Offer in Compromise agreement will be considered settled after the taxpayer meets the OIC requirements.

The IRS has sole discretion to refuse an OIC offer and they do so approximately 80% of the time. Continued negotiations frequently will yield an acceptable offer for both the government and Kansas taxpayers. Offer in Compromise can be expensive, time consuming and expensive. Unfortunately, if the OIC offer is refused and negotiations fail, the IRS can use all of the taxpayer’s financial data they have gathered to continue their aggressive collection efforts.

Qualifying for Offer in Compromise

Not all Kansas taxpayers will have a valid reason for an Offer in Compromise. To qualify for an OIC, Kansas taxpayers must meet one of the following criteria:

  • Doubt as to Liability- Kansas taxpayers who doubt the amount of tax liability they have been assessed may be able to qualify under this condition. This condition is not frequently used.
  • Doubt as to Collectibility- Under certain conditions the IRS may determine it is unlikely or too expensive to collect a Kansas taxpayer’s federal tax debt.  If they believe this is the case, the IRS may accept an Offer in Compromise. This condition differs from the first in that the amount of IRS tax debt is not in doubt, only the ability of the Internal Revenue Service to collect the debt.
  • Effective Tax Administration- Kansas residents who may suffer “an economic hardship which is unfair and inequitable” if they pay their federal tax debt may qualify for an Offer in Compromise. This condition is most frequently used for the elderly and the handicapped.

Kansas taxpayers must also complete the following tasks:

  • All future IRS tax debt must be paid on or before the federal tax deadline for the next five years.
  • Offer in Compromise requirements must be completed.
  • Kansas taxpayers must complete and submit all of their IRS tax returns by the federal tax deadline.

Installment Agreement

The most popular IRS tax settlement option available to settle outstanding tax debt is the installment agreement. Kansas taxpayers can use an installment agreement or IA to repay all of their IRS tax debt in monthly installments. Kansa taxpayers who owe $25,000 or less can usually qualify for an IA to pay all of their IRS tax debt within 60 months.

Kansas taxpayers who owe more than $25,000 may want to discuss their installment options with a tax professional that has the expertise needed to negotiate an installment agreement with the IRS. It is always less expensive to pay all taxes, penalties and interest in one lump sum payment. Penalties and interest will continue to accrue throughout the installment agreement.

An installment agreement can be terminated by the IRS for any of the following reasons:

  • Failing to make all the required IA payments (either partial or full). First time offenders may have a grace period of 30-60 days before the installment agreement is terminated.
  • Failing to file federal tax returns
  • A taxpayer’s financial situation greatly improves. (The IRS can review the IA every two years.)
  • A Kansas taxpayer provides inaccurate information on the installment agreement application.

Kansas taxpayers who are applying for an installment agreement must meet the following conditions:

  • All self-employed Kansas taxpayers must file quarterly tax returns and pay quarterly tax payments.
  • Kansas taxpayers must file federal tax returns.
  • Kansas taxpayers must pay federal tax debt for the 5 years before the tax liability which can not be paid.
  • Kansas taxpayers can not have had another installment agreement with the Internal Revenue Service with in the last 5 years.

Partial Payment Installment Agreement

Due to financial conditions, certain Kansas residents will not be able to settle their IRS tax debt with an installment agreement and may not qualify for an Offer in Compromise. A partial payment installment agreement (PPIA) is another option available to taxpayers to make partial monthly payments for tax debt. The PPIA will not pay the full amount of the tax debt and the taxes not paid will be considered forgiven by the Internal Revenue Service.

Partial payment installment agreements are popular because they are less complicated, less time consuming and less expensive than an OIC. Kansas taxpayers who use the PPIA will avoid IRS collections, but penalties and interest on the IRS tax debt will continue to accrue. The IRS will review the PPIA every 2 years and if the Kansas taxpayer’s financial situation has improved, the PPIA may be cancelled or revised. Paying a lump sum payment for all tax debt is always less expensive than any type of installment agreement.

Currently Not Collectible

The Internal Revenue Service may decide some debt can not be collected. Kansas residents who can not pay their tax debt may have their debt categorized as currently not collectible. Currently not collectible will stop all IRS tax collection actions including tax levies and wage garnishments. The Internal Revenue Service will send a written notification each year listing the amount of outstanding tax debt. This is not a tax bill. If after ten years the IRS has failed to collect the tax debt, the time limit for collections will expire and the debt will be forgiven.

Penalty Abatement

The Internal Revenue Service may assess penalties for a variety of taxpayer infractions including but not limited to: failing to file a tax return, claiming a false refund, or inaccurately reporting tax information. Penalties are abated or reduced for valid reasons only such personal duress, disasters, inaccurate tax advice from a tax professional or failing health. The IRS may not be willing to abate all penalties.

West Virginia IRS Tax Settlement Options

West Virginia taxpayers who have outstanding IRS tax debt and who are facing aggressive IRS collection actions may be able to settle their tax debt with an IRS tax settlement option. West Virginia taxpayers who choose certain IRS tax settlement options may be able to repay their tax debt at a fraction of the full amount of tax debt owed.

The federal government has given the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) the ability to collect federal taxes which are then used to fund the activities of the federal government. With this authority, the IRS can decide how much money they are willing to accept to repay outstanding tax debt and can use wage garnishments, property repossession and bank account levies to compel taxpayers to pay tax debt. All West Virginia taxpayers who need more information about IRS tax settlement options can contact a tax professional for help.

Offer in Compromise

Offer in Compromise (OIC) is a popular method used by West Virginia taxpayers to settle IRS tax debt. With an OIC, a West Virginia taxpayer can make an offer to the IRS, and if the IRS accepts the offer the debt outlined in the OIC agreement will be considered settled. An OIC may allow a taxpayer to pay less than the full amount of tax debt owed.

The IRS denies most OIC offers and if denied, the taxpayer may be able to negotiate or appeal the decision.  The IRS will have sole authority to deny or accept all OIC offers. West Virginia taxpayers do not have the ability to sue the IRS or take them to court to compel them to accept OIC offers.

Offer in Compromise stops penalties and interest from accruing and stops all IRS collection efforts, but OIC can be difficult to implement and time consuming. In the OIC application process the IRS will request detailed financial information, and if the OIC is denied the IRS may use this information to continue their collection efforts. Offer in Compromise can be an effective IRS tax settlement option, but it may not be the best one for all West Virginia taxpayers.

Qualifying for Offer in Compromise

Everyone who requests an Offer in Compromise will not qualify for one. West Virginia taxpayers must meet one of the following conditions:

  • Doubt as to Liability- Errors do not frequently occur, but could if the IRS made a miscalculation or misapplied tax laws. If the IRS decides the amount of tax debt assessed against the West Virginia taxpayer may be incorrect, they may be willing to accept an Offer in Compromise.
  • Doubt as to Collectibility- This condition differs from the first. The amount of tax liability is not in question, only the ability of the IRS to collect the tax debt. Under this condition the IRS also may be willing to accept an OIC if they believe the cost to collect the tax debt is too high.
  • Effective Tax Administration- West Virginia taxpayers who may suffer a hardship which could be inequitable or unfair if they pay their federal tax debt may qualify for an Offer in Compromise. The elderly and the handicapped are most likely to qualify under this condition.

West Virginia taxpayers also must complete the following tasks:

  • Complete federal tax returns and make their federal tax payments before the tax deadline for the next five years.
  • Complete the Offer in Compromise requirements.

Installment Agreement

Another common IRS tax settlement option for West Virginia taxpayers to repay tax debt is called an installment agreement. Installment agreements require all federal tax debt to be repaid, but they allow West Virginia taxpayers to spread out tax payments over a specified time period and pay the tax in monthly installments. The time allowed for repayment varies based on the amount of tax owed.

Taxpayers who owe $25,000 or less can usually qualify for an installment agreement. West Virginia taxpayers who more than $25,000 should contact a tax professional (certified public accountant, enrolled agent or tax attorney) to negotiate a repayment plan.

Penalties and interest will continue to accrue throughout the repayment period, but the IRS will stop their collection actions. It will always be more expensive to use an installment agreement than to pay all IRS tax debt in a one time lump sum payment.

The Internal Revenue Service can cancel an installment agreement for a variety of reasons including:

  • If the West Virginia taxpayer fails to pay the full monthly installment payment each month. First time violators may be granted a 30-60 day grace period.
  • If the West Virginia taxpayer does not submit their federal tax return every year.
  • If the West Virginia taxpayer’s financial situation improves significantly.
  • If the West Virginia taxpayer provides incorrect financial information to the IRS for the installment agreement.
  • If the West Virginia taxpayer is self-employed and does not file their federal tax returns each quarter or make estimated quarterly tax payments.
  • If the West Virginia taxpayer does not pay their tax payments for the five years before the IRS tax debt which can not be paid.
  • If the West Virginia taxpayer has had another installment agreement within the last 5 years.

Partial Payment Installment Agreement

West Virginia taxpayers who do not qualify or want to use an Offer in Compromise or who can not repay their federal tax debt with an installment agreement may be able to use a partial payment installment agreement (PPIA). The PPIA allows the taxpayer to pay only part of their tax debt in monthly installment payments. The IRS will determine what amount of debt will not be part of the PPIA and this debt will be forgiven.

Penalties and interest will continue to accrue during the installment period, but the IRS will stop all attempts to collect outstanding IRS tax debt. The IRS will review the PPIA every two years to determine if the West Virginia taxpayer’s financial condition has substantially improved. If it has, the IRS has the authority to cancel the PPIA or to increase the PPIA payments.

Currently Not Collectible

West Virginia taxpayers who can not pay their federal tax debt with an IRS tax settlement option may have their tax status changed to “currently not collectible”. Under this tax status, the IRS will cease all collection actions, but penalties and interest will continue to accrue.

The IRS will send a notice to the West Virginia taxpayer every year detailing the amount of tax debt owed. This notice is not considered a tax bill. If the IRS has not attempted or succeeded in collecting the tax debt within 10 years (the statutory time limit) the tax debt will be forgiven.

Penalty Abatement

West Virginia taxpayers who make tax errors such as failing to pay federal taxes, failing to file a tax return, requesting a false refund or misrepresenting their tax information may have penalties assessed against them. If the West Virginia taxpayer has a valid reason for the tax infraction the IRS may be willing to lower or abate the penalty.  Valid reasons could include: personal duress, poor mental or physical health or bad professional advice. West Virginia taxpayers who have had penalties assessed against them can contact a tax professional for help. The IRS may not be willing to lower or abate all penalties.

IRS Tax Settlement Options In Washington

The IRS has several tax settlement options that Washington taxpayers may be able to use to repay their IRS tax debt. The IRS has the authority to collect tax debt and under certain conditions may be willing to accept less than the full amount of tax owed.

Washington taxpayers who fail to pay their federal taxes may face very aggressive IRS collection actions such as wage garnishment, repossession and bank account levies. To avoid these actions the Washington taxpayer can contact a tax professional (tax accountant, tax attorney or enrolled agent) for information about IRS tax settlement options and which one may be best for Washington taxpayers.

Offer in Compromise in Washington

Offer in Compromise is one of the most popular tax settlement options. Offer in Compromise or OIC allows the Washington taxpayer to make a settlement offer to the IRS, and if the IRS accepts the offer it is considered a compromise payment. Penalties and interest will stop accumulating and the IRS will stop all collection actions after the Offer in Compromise is accepted.

The IRS denies up to 80% of initial OIC offers and the taxpayer does not have the legal ability to compel the IRS to accept the offer. Offer in Compromise can be very time consuming, expensive and difficult to implement, but it can be an effective method to settle IRS tax debt for less than the full amount owed. Unfortunately, the IRS will need detailed financial information to process the OIC agreement, and if the OIC is denied they can use the information they have collected to continue tax collection.

Not all Washington taxpayers who want an Offer in Compromise will qualify for one. Washington taxpayers must meet one of the following conditions:

  1. Doubt as to Liability-  If there is doubt as to the amount of tax debt owed, an OIC may be accepted. Liability may be questioned if there was an error in the tax calculation or if the tax law was misinterpreted. This condition is uncommon.
  2. Doubt as to Collectibility- Under this condition the amount of tax debt is not in question, only the ability of the IRS to collect the IRS tax debt. The IRS also may accept an OIC under this condition if they doubt their ability to collect the tax debt within the statutory period for collection.
  3. Effective Tax Administration- If a Washington taxpayer may suffer an “economic hardship which is unfair or inequitable” the IRS may accept an Offer in Compromise. The handicapped and elderly most frequently meet this OIC option.

Washington taxpayers are required to complete the following requirements:

  • All Offer in Compromise requirements must be completed.
  • Washington taxpayers must pay all of their federal tax debt for the next five years before the IRS tax deadline.
  • All tax returns must be filed by the Washington taxpayer on or before the federal tax deadline.
  • The IRS will apply all federal tax refunds (for the Washington taxpayer) toward the outstanding tax debt.

Installment Agreement

Washington taxpayers can also use an installment agreement to repay their IRS tax debt. Installment agreements allow taxpayers to repay all of their IRS tax debt in monthly installment payments. Washington taxpayers who owe $25,000 or less can generally qualify for an installment agreement. Washington taxpayers who owe more than $25,000 should contact a tax professional to help negotiate an installment agreement with the IRS.

The installment agreement can be simpler and less expensive than Offer in Compromise. Penalties and interest will continue to accumulate for the full duration of the installment period, but the IRS will stop all collection actions. Washington taxpayers must complete the following requirements to qualify for an installment agreement:

  • Washington taxpayers who are self-employed must file federal tax returns and pay quarterly tax estimates.
  • Washington taxpayers must file all federal tax forms.
  • Washington taxpayers must pay all IRS tax debt for the 5 years before the amount outlined in the installment agreement.
  • Washington taxpayers can not have had another installment agreement within the last 5 five years.

Partial Payment Installment Agreement

Washington taxpayers who can not pay all of their tax payments with an installment agreement or who do not qualify for an Offer in Compromise may be able to use a partial payment installment agreement (PPIA) to pay their IRS tax debt. The PPIA differs from the installment agreement because the taxpayer will only have to make partial payments. Whatever debt is not part of the PPIA will be considered forgiven by the IRS.

The IRS will stop all collection actions if the taxpayer qualifies for a PPIA, but penalties and interest will continue to accrue.  The IRS will review the partial payment installment agreement every two years to determine if the Washington taxpayer’s financial status has improved. If it has, the IRS has the authority to increase the PPIA payments or cancel the PPIA entirely. A partial payment installment agreement will always cost more than paying IRS tax payments with a one time lump sum payment.

Currently Not Collectible

Not all Washington taxpayers can pay all of their IRS tax debt. If the IRS determines this is the case, they will change the taxpayer’s tax status to “currently not collectible”. Under this tax status, penalties and interest will continue to accrue, but the IRS will stop all collection actions against the Washington taxpayer. The Internal Revenue Service will send notice to the Washington taxpayer every year outlining the amount of tax debt the taxpayer owes. This notice is not a tax bill. If the IRS fails to collect the IRS tax debt within the statutory period (10 years) the tax debt will be forgiven.

Penalty Abatement

Washington taxpayers that fail to pay their federal taxes, submit incorrect financial information on a tax return, fail to submit tax forms or request a false refund may face tax penalties. The IRS may be willing to abate or lower certain tax penalties if the Washington taxpayer has a valid reason for the tax infraction. Valid reasons could include: personal duress, false professional advice, poor mental or physical health or if they are a victim of a natural disaster. The IRS may not be willing to lower or abate all tax penalties.

North Carolina IRS Tax Settlement Options

North Carolina taxpayers who have excessive IRS back taxes which they are unable to pay may find relief with one of the IRS tax settlement options offered by the Internal Revenue Service. The IRS has been given the ability by the federal government to collect federal taxes. If North Carolina taxpayers fail to pay their tax debt they may become the target of aggressive tax collection efforts by the IRS. The IRS is authorized to use a variety of techniques to collect taxes including: wage garnishment, property repossession or bank account levies.

Any North Carolina taxpayer who is interested in avoiding the IRS tax collectors or settling their IRS tax debt can contact a tax professional to discuss their tax payment options. The IRS may be willing to settle back tax debt for a fraction of the full amount owed if it means the taxpayer may be able to pay their future federal taxes.

Offer in Compromise

Many North Carolina taxpayers have had success settling IRS tax debt with Offer in Compromise. Offer in Compromise allows the taxpayer to suggest a tax amount to settle their tax debt and if the IRS accepts the settlement offer the tax outlined in the OIC will be settled.

If the Offer in Compromise is accepted, penalties and interest will stop accruing and the IRS will cease all collection actions. Offer in Compromise can be difficult to implement and time consuming. North Carolina taxpayers also will have to provide detailed information to the IRS which the IRS can use against them to continue tax collection if the OIC is denied.

The Internal Revenue Service denies approximately 80% of first time Offer in Compromise offers but may be willing to negotiate with the taxpayer to find a settlement amount which is agreeable to the federal government and to the North Carolina taxpayer. All North Carolina taxpayers who are considering Offer in Compromise may want to contact a tax professional. OIC is one of several IRS tax settlement options available and it may not be the best option for all North Carolina taxpayers.

Qualifying for Offer in Compromise

Certain conditions must be met by the North Carolina taxpayer to qualify for Offer in Compromise. The IRS will only grant an OIC if taxpayers meet one of the following:

  • Doubt as to Liability- The IRS will accept an Offer in Compromise if the amount of tax debt assessed against the taxpayer could be incorrect. Errors can occur if the IRS miscalculates the tax debt or if some of the taxpayer’s financial information was not considered. This condition is not frequently met.
  • Doubt as to Collectibility- The IRS will accept an Offer in Compromise if they doubt they can collect the debt either now or in the future. An OIC may also be accepted if the cost to collect the debt is considered too high.
  • Effective Tax Administration- Payment of IRS tax debt may cause some North Carolina taxpayers a hardship which is “inequitable or unfair”. The IRS may accept an OIC if this condition is met. This condition is most frequently used for the handicapped and elderly.

The following Offer in Compromise requirements must also be met:

  • Taxpayers must pay all IRS tax debt before the federal deadline for the next five years.
  • Taxpayers must meet all of the OIC requirements and pay the Offer in Compromise payments.
  • All requested Offer in Compromise information and additional federal tax forms must be sent to the IRS.

Installment Agreement

Installment agreements (IA) are the most common method used by taxpayers to pay their outstanding IRS tax debt. The installment agreement can be less complicated and less difficult to implement than an OIC, but the taxpayer will have to pay all of the outstanding debt in monthly installment payments. The amount of money owed will determine how quickly the payments must be completed.

Most taxpayers can qualify for an installment agreement if they owe $25,000 or less in outstanding IRS tax debt. North Carolina taxpayers who owe more than $25,000 should contact a tax professional (enrolled agent, tax attorney or certified public accountant) for help negotiating the IA.

The installment agreement will not stop penalties and interest from accruing on the outstanding tax debt, but it will stop all IRS collections. The installment agreement will not be the cheapest method to pay tax debt. To avoid penalties and interest tax debt should be paid as soon as possible and in one lump sum payment.

If the North Carolina taxpayer does not follow all of the requirements of the installment agreement the IRS has the authority to terminate the IA. Violations of the installment agreement could include:

  • Not paying or paying less than the agreed upon installment payment. The IRS may grant first time violators a 30-60 day grace period.
  • Not filing a federal tax return every year.
  • If the North Carolina taxpayer’s financial position dramatically improves.
  • Falsifying information on the installment agreement application.
  • If self-employed North Carolina taxpayers do not file federal tax returns each quarter or pay estimated tax payments each quarter.
  • Failing to pay all tax payments for the five years before the federal tax debt which can not be paid.
  • If the North Caroline taxpayer had another installment agreement within the last five years.

Partial Payment Installment Agreement

North Carolina taxpayers who can not pay the full amount of tax payments with an installment agreement and who do not qualify for an OIC may be able to use the partial payment installment agreement (PPIA) to settle their tax debt. Unlike the installment agreement, the PPIA will allow the taxpayer to make partial monthly installment payments over a specified period of time. The debt which is not included in the PPIA will be forgiven by the IRS.

Penalties and interest will continue to accrue during the PPIA, but the IRS will cease all collections. The Internal Revenue Service will review the PPIA every 2 years and if the North Carolina taxpayer’s financial situation has dramatically improved, the PPIA can be modified to require larger tax payments or completely cancelled.

Currently Not Collectible

North Carolina taxpayers who can not pay their IRS tax debt may have their tax status changed to currently not collectible. Penalties and interest will continue to collect on the outstanding tax debt, but the IRS will cease collections.

Every year the Internal Revenue Service will send a written notice to the taxpayer outlining the status of the tax debt. This notice is not a bill. The IRS will have ten years to collect the outstanding IRS tax debt before the statute of limitations expires.

Penalty Abatement

The IRS can charge North Carolina taxpayers penalties for certain tax violations including: failure to file a federal tax return, misstating financial information (either accidently or on purpose) or requesting a false refund. If there is a valid reason, the IRS may be willing to lower or abate tax penalties. Valid reasons may include: incorrect tax professional advice, poor mental or physical health, personal duress, or if the taxpayer is a victim of a natural disaster.

IRS Tax Settlement Options For Nebraska residents

Internal Revenue Service Tax Settlement Options

Nebraska taxpayers who have federal tax debt that they are unable to repay, may be able to work with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to settle their tax liability through a IRS tax settlement option. It is in the best interest of the Internal Revenue Service to settle back IRS tax debt as soon as possible and in the process, hopefully put the taxpayer in a position to pay all future tax obligations.

Nebraska taxpayers who have outstanding IRS tax debt should not wait until the Internal Revenue Service contacts them or begins their threatening debt collection tactics. Tax professionals such as tax attorneys, enrolled tax agents or Certified tax accountants all have experience negotiating with the Internal Revenue Service and can help outline the best option for Nebraska taxpayers.

Offer in Compromise

Offer in Compromise is one of the most popular types of Internal Revenue Service tax settlement options used to settle or compromise tax debt. The Internal Revenue Service may be willing to accept an offer which is substantially less than the full amount of back tax debt owed. Many Offer in Compromise offers will not be accepted at the initial application level, but may be accepted on appeal.

The Internal Revenue Service has sole discretion to accept or deny all Offer in Compromise offers and Nebraska taxpayers will not have the legal authority to sue the IRS.  Most Offer in Compromise offers are denied because the Internal Revenue Service believes the offer is too low.

Not all OIC offers will be accepted. Nebraska taxpayers who are considering an Offer in Compromise must meet one of the following conditions:

  • Effective Tax Administration- Certain Nebraska residents may be able to prove that paying their federal tax liability will cause “an economic hardship which is unfair and inequitable”. If the IRS agrees they may accept an Offer in Compromise offer. This condition is used frequently for the handicapped and the disabled.
  • Doubt as to Collectibility- Under certain conditions the Internal Revenue Service may determine that collection of a tax debt will be too costly or it is unlikely that the tax debt will ever be collected. Under this condition, the Internal Revenue Service may be willing to accept an Offer in Compromise.
  • Doubt as to Liability- Under this condition the ability to collect the IRS tax debt is not in question, but the Internal Revenue Service may accept the contention of the taxpayer that the amount they have been assessed may be incorrect. This condition is seldom met.

Nebraska residents who meet one of the above conditions must also complete the following tasks to qualify for an Offer in Compromise:

  • Nebraska taxpayers must pay all of their federal taxes on time for the next five years.
  • If the Offer in Compromise is accepted, the OIC plan must be completed as outlined.
  • Nebraska taxpayers must complete their tax returns and pay the federal taxes due on or before the tax extension deadline.
  • The Internal Revenue Service will use all federal tax refunds to pay the taxpayer’s outstanding tax debt.

Installment Agreement

An installment agreement is another tax settlement option a taxpayer may use to repay their tax liability in monthly payments or installments. The type of installment plan allowed will vary depending on the amount of tax debt owed. Nebraska taxpayers who owe $10,000 or less, not including taxes and penalties, can use the guaranteed installment agreement. This plan will require the entire amount to be repaid with in three years.

Nebraska taxpayers who owe less than $25,000 or less can use a streamlined installment agreement which requires the amount to be paid with in five years. Nebraska residents who owe more than $25,000 should contact a tax professional who has the necessary experience to negotiate an installment agreement with the Internal Revenue Service. Penalties and Interest will continue to accrue under the installment agreement. It is always less expensive to pay Internal Revenue Service tax debt in one lump sum as soon as possible.

Nebraska residents must complete the following tasks to qualify for an installment agreement:

  • All Nebraska taxpayers who are self-employed must file and pay quarterly tax estimates.
  • Nebraska taxpayers must pay all tax liability for the five years prior to the tax liability which can not be paid.
  • Nebraska taxpayers must file all federal tax returns for previous years.
  • Nebraska taxpayers can not have an installment plan agreement with in the past five years.

Partial Payment Installment Agreement

Nebraska residents who owe tax liability and can not pay it with an installment agreement, may be able to make partial payments with a partial payment installment agreement (PPIA). One benefit of this plan is it will stop IRS debt collection efforts against the taxpayer. The Internal Revenue Service will review the taxpayer’s financial information every two years to determine if the terms of the plan should be modified or if the partial payment installment agreement should be terminated.

Currently Not Collectible

Given the current economic climate, there may be certain Nebraska residents who are unable to pay their past federal tax debt. In certain extreme financial conditions, the Internal Revenue Service may declare the taxpayer’s tax debt as currently not collectible. If the IRS makes this determination, tax collection efforts will cease against the taxpayer and the Internal Revenue Service will release the levies which have been imposed. Unfortunately, the penalties and interest will continue to accrue and the tax debt will not disappear.

Penalty Abatement

Nebraska taxpayers may be assessed penalties on outstanding IRS tax debt for a variety of reasons including: failure to file a tax return, failure to pay tax debt, falsifying financial information, or claiming a false refund.

Under certain conditions the Internal Revenue Service may be willing, with good reason, to eliminate or reduce penalties through penalty abatement. The Internal Revenue Service may not allow all penalties to be eliminated. Contact a tax professional for specific legal advice concerning penalty abatement.

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