Category Archives: Income Tax Settlement

Federal income tax and asset protection

If you owe money to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) related to unpaid federal income tax, you have likely experienced an escalating series of attempts by the IRS to collect that unpaid money.  The taxes we pay to the IRS are used in large part to fund the federal government of the United States.  If federal income tax is not paid or collected, the government simply will not have the funding needed to function.  Therefore, the IRS has been given powerful authority to seek and collect payment of unpaid federal income tax.

If you do not willingly pay the federal income tax you owe or work with the IRS to establish some form of payment plan, the IRS is able to enforce its authority to collect those unpaid taxes through the use of a levy.  A levy is a legal means by which the IRS is able to seize property from a taxpayer.  An IRS levy leaves you little in the way of asset protection, as the IRS can use a levy to seize your wages, checking and savings account balances, cars and trucks, retirement accounts, and real estate.

If you owe money to the IRS and believe they may obtain an IRS levy against your property, what you may be more interested in understanding is asset protection–that is, what assets are protected from an IRS levy?  Following is information about two ways you can establish asset protection against an IRS levy.

Obtain an IRS Exemption

The easiest means of asset protection is through an asset exemption offered by the Internal Revenue Service.  When the IRS exempts an assets from a levy, it means the IRS will not attempt to seize that asset.

The IRS generally exempts assets in two cases.  First, the IRS will not seize assets that are required in order for you to earn an income.  For example, if you are a handyman and you need your truck and tools to perform work, the IRS will likely allows you to keep those assets.

Second, the IRS will not seize assets that have no value.  This may include things that they simply cannot sell or assets that already have a liability attached to them.  For example, if you own a home but your mortgage is for an amount equal to the value of the home, then the IRS likely will not seize your home, because there would be no money left over after funds from the sale are used to pay off the mortgage.

Transfer Ownership

Assets that are transferred to ownership by someone else are not subject to seizure by the Internal Revenue Service, simply because they are no longer your asset.  However, such a transfer must occur well before the IRS levy goes into effect, as any asset transfer after the IRS levy is in place will be reversed by the IRS levy so the IRS can seize the asset.

Even if you transfer an asset to someone else before an IRS levy is enforced against you, if the transfer was purely to try to keep the IRS from seizing the asset, the IRS levy will still give the IRS power to seize the asset.

 

Some people may advise you that you can hide assets from the Internal Revenue Service by not telling the IRS about the assets and placing them in difficult-to-find locations such as offshore accounts.  However, hiding assets from the IRS is technically illegal and can result in serious repercussions if the IRS finds out you have lied to them or otherwise misled them about the assets you own.

Before you take any steps to shield your assets from an IRS levy, you should speak with a tax attorney.

How can I discuss my situation with a tax attorney?

By completing the short form found below, it will allow a tax attorney to contact you to discuss your situation.  The tax attorney will be knowledgeable about the statutes related to Internal Revenue Service tax levies and asset protection and will be able to evaluate your situation in light of these laws.

The conversation you have with the tax attorney will be free of charge, completely confidential, and will not obligate you to anything further.  Therefore, please take advantage of this opportunity to have an initial consultation with a tax attorney about your tax issues.

Federal income tax return penalties and what to do next

Federal income tax returns are due to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) each year on or around April 15.  Once you have filed your tax return, it is generally the end of the matter for you.  Your federal income tax return is processed and you do not think about your taxes again until the following year.

But this year for some reason you received a notice from the IRS.  Specifically, the IRS notice indicates that they are charging you a penalty related to your federal income tax return.  Why?  Read on to find out the main reason the IRS may say you owe them money and what you need to do about it.

Once you file your federal income tax return, the IRS will review the return to determine if it appears to be complete and accurate.  If the IRS deems the return is complete and accurate, they will process it.  If the IRS detects some sort of issue, they will send you a notice describing what the issue is and what it means to you.  A list of many notices the IRS may send appears on the IRS’ web site at http://www.irs.gov/individuals/article/0,,id=96199,00.html.

If you receive a notice from the IRS indicating they are charging you a penalty, it is usually because you owe a tax liability to the IRS that you have failed to pay.  Many people do not realize that when you file your federal income tax return, if you owe a tax liability to the IRS, the IRS expects you to pay the tax liability at the time you file.  Even if you file an extension for your tax return, the extension only relates to allowing you more time to file your tax return.  The IRS still expects you to pay your tax liability due on or around April 15.

If you filed your tax return and did not owe a tax liability, yet you still received a notice from the IRS that you now owe them money related to a penalty, it is possible that you made an error on your taxes.  In the process of the IRS reviewing your tax return for completeness and accuracy, if they detect and correct an error, it could mean that you now owe money to them.  And since the IRS detected the issue after the time when you should have paid the balance due, you may not be assessed a penalty.

Whatever the reason for the penalty or money you owe to the IRS, your best option is to get help from a tax attorney.

Obtaining help from a tax attorney

If you need help with your federal income tax, you can the help you need from a tax attorney.  If you complete the short form found below, a tax attorney can review your case free of charge and start giving you direction on how to address the penalty you received from the IRS.  The tax attorney can help you with the completion of any forms or other steps necessary to address the issue.

Any conversations you have with a tax attorney are completely confidential, and the initial consultation does not obligate you to anything further.  Therefore, take advantage of this opportunity today to help minimize the money you owe to the IRS and put the matter behind you.

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Federal income tax have the IRS on your back?

If you owe money on a past tax return to the Internal Revenue Service (the IRS), you have probably found that they are very persistent in hunting you down in an attempt to get their money.  The initial contact from the IRS may simply come in the form of letters and phone calls under the guise of being sure you are aware that you owe them back taxes related to your tax return.  However, as time passes and the IRS continues to either not hear from you at all or not receive the money you owe them, they will realize that the non-payment of the back taxes is not simply an oversight on your part.

As the IRS can in general seek to collect back taxes for up to 10 years from the date when you filed the tax return related to that money, it is very difficult to outlast the IRS.  Before the 10-year statute of limitations runs out, the IRS will generally file a levy against you to take your property, forcing collection of the back tax owed.

However, you do have options to keep the IRS from continuing to harass you.  Here are some solutions you should consider.

Pay the federal income tax you owe.  If you are looking for help with your tax return and back taxes you owe, then odds are that you simply cannot afford to pay the back tax that you owe on your tax return.  Regardless, this point is worth mentioning and evaluating fully to ensure this solution is not an option.

If you do not have the cash available to pay the tax you owe on your tax return, do you have any other assets or property—cars, boats, homes, jewelry, real estate—you could sell for enough money to cover the back tax?  If you do and you have not been willing to sell the property because it has sentimental or other important value to you, remember that selling other property you have may be a viable solution to get the IRS off your back.

Negotiate a settlement with the IRS.  The IRS has options available to help people pay back federal income tax they owe.  One of these options is a payment plan or settlement agreement, which means that you will pay all the tax you owe not as a single lump-sum payment but as a series of payments over time.  This means that you may be able to work out with the IRS a monthly payment you can afford to address the back taxes you owe.

A second option is an offer in compromise.  An offer in compromise is when the IRS agrees to accept less than the full amount of federal income tax you owe.  But before you assume this is the best option for you, simply because it means you will have to pay less money than you thought you would, keep in mind that the IRS does not enter into an offer in compromise with a taxpayer without a good reason.  For the IRS to accept an offer in compromise, they must believe that they are unlikely to ever receive the full payment, because you have no assets or income.  In addition, you must file every past due tax return you have not filed previously.

Declare bankruptcy.  Bankruptcy is an option for addressing money you owe on a past tax return in certain cases.  Specifically, if the back tax is related to the previous three tax years, an amount assessed by the Internal Revenue Service in the past 240 days, or an amount related to an income tax return you never filed, bankruptcy cannot be used to get rid of the back taxes.  This is true whether you use Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy, the two most common types of bankruptcies used by individuals.

Whatever your situation, before you decide one of the above options may be for you in addressing your federal income tax situation, it would be wise to speak with a tax attorney.

Can a tax attorney help me figure out what I should do?

Yes, a tax attorney will be able to help evaluate your back taxes and determine what options is best for your situation.  The tax attorney will have experience working with cases related to past due federal income tax–situations like yours–and will know what to do.

The initial conversation you have with a tax attorney will be free of charge, completely confidential, and not obligate you to anything further.  Therefore, please take this opportunity today to learn what options you have to address your back taxes and get the IRS off your back.

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My tax return has been miscalculated by the IRS. What can I do?

When you submit your federal income tax return to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) each year, obviously the idea is for you to submit an accurate tax return.  Whether you have calculated your federal income tax yourself or hired a tax professional to prepare your tax return—such as a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) or tax attorney—the income and deductions on the tax return should reflect actual events and be supported by various documentation.  This supporting documentation can include your W-2, statements from your bank or mortgage company reflecting interest paid or earned, logs you have maintained of business mileage, contribution forms from charitable organizations, and similar documents.  While you do not have to include this supporting documentation when you file your tax return, it should still be used as the basis for the numbers and other information submitted on your tax return, and you should retain copies of that supporting documentation.

When the IRS receives your federal income tax return, the IRS performs several basic checks and reviews of the information on the return before accepting the return and beginning to process your refund (assuming a refund is due to you).  This review includes the following:

  • Ensuring the names and Social Security Numbers on the tax return match and have not been used on other returns,
  • Ensuring calculations—whether addition or subtraction—are accurate and that the various deductions and exemptions are valid for the taxpayer’s situation for the current tax year, and
  • Ensuring common indicators of fraud are not present.

In addition to the above checks performed before accepting a return in a given tax year, the IRS can perform a more detailed review for audit purposes.  The IRS can review federal income tax returns in detail for up to three years, or for up to six years if the IRS believes a serious mistake has been made on a return, to determine if a formal audit of the return should be conducted.

In either of the above processes, whether the normal review done on all returns or the more detailed review conducted in selecting federal income tax returns for an audit and conducting that audit, the IRS may make changes on your return that may result in you owing more tax.  It is also possible that the IRS will make a mistake when determining your return is not accurate, resulting in a miscalculation of the tax debt you owe.

If the IRS has legitimately miscalculated your tax debt, there are two main causes.  First, it can be a simple error.  Second, it can be because the IRS did not receive sufficient support to allow a deduction, exemption, or other item on your return.  In either case, you should take similar steps to resolve the matter.

Have a tax attorney review your return and any information provided by the IRS as to why they believe your return is not accurate.  If the tax attorney believes the IRS has made a mistake, you should make use of the appeals process for tax disputes.  The appeals process is handled by an independent body from the IRS with the goal of attempting to resolve tax disputes in a fair and unbiased manner.

Additional information about appealing your taxes is available on the IRS web site at http://www.irs.gov/individuals/content/0,,id=98196,00.html .

How can I get help in reviewing my situation and filing an appeal if it is right for me?

If you complete the short form found below, a tax attorney who is knowledgeable about federal income tax returns and the processes for appealing IRS decisions that may be in error will contact you.  The tax attorney can have an initial discuss about your situation free of charge and without further obligation to you, and you can rest assured that nothing you share with the tax attorney will be discussed with anyone else, including the IRS.  Therefore, you should take this opportunity today to get help in determining if an error has been made by the IRS on your tax return and taking the steps to be sure you pay only the minimum tax you can.

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What are the top five steps to take if you owe tax debt?

It will only be a few months before the new year, which means it will be time to start preparing to file your federal income tax return with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) for the 2011 tax year.  When you calculate your federal income tax, you could be one of the many who find that you owe additional tax.  When this happens, what should you do?

Following are five things you should keep in mind when you owe a tax debt to the IRS.

Obtain help from a professional tax preparer. Did you obtain help from someone when you calculated your income tax, either a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) or another professional tax preparer?  If you did not, you should have a tax preparer check your work.  There is the possibility that when you calculated your taxes and found that you owed money, you made a mistake.  You could have left out a deduction or made other errors that led to you owe more money than you should owe or that may prevent you from getting a refund due to you.  And depending on the mistake, it is not likely that the IRS will find and correct the mistake for you.  Therefore, be sure your taxes are correct if you find you owe money.

File your tax return. Once you complete your tax return, you need to file it, even if you owe money and cannot afford to pay it.  The IRS will charge you interest and a penalty when you file your tax return and fail to include a payment for the tax you owe.  But if you do not file your tax return at all, the IRS will charge a much larger interest rate and penalty on the unpaid tax balance.  Therefore, it is in your best interest to file your tax return on time and then work out a strategy for paying the tax liability due.

Pay the tax you owe. If you owe tax to the IRS, it is in your best interest to simply pay it when it is due on April 15 if you can afford to do so.  As noted above, delaying payment of your tax will generally result in you still having to pay the tax you owe in addition to interest and penalties charged by the IRS.

Contact the IRS. If you cannot afford to pay the tax you owe, you should contact the IRS.  The IRS has several options to work with taxpayers who cannot afford to pay their taxes in one lump sum, including a payment plan and an offer in compromise.  But to even be considered for one of these payment options, you must file your taxes and work within the IRS’ system for applying.

Hire a tax attorney. If you owe money to the IRS you cannot afford to pay, a tax attorney will be able to help you.  A tax attorney has training and experience with tax matters, including working with the IRS.  An attorney will be able to help evaluate your specific tax situation, if you are likely to qualify for one of the IRS’ payment options for settling your tax debt, and if you do appear to be a candidate, helping you complete the application to increase the likelihood that the IRS will accept it.

How can I get help from a tax attorney?

If you complete the short form below, a tax attorney can review your tax issue free of charge.  This review is completely confidential and does not obligate you to anything further.  So take advantage of this change to get help in addressing the taxes you owe.

Can a tax attorney guarantee results?

While a tax attorney can help you resolve your tax issues, they cannot guarantee a specific result.  Each case is unique.  Although a tax attorney will know the tax law applicable to a given situation and how the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) generally treats each such situation, there is no requirement that the IRS respond to your situation in the exact same manner as they have other similar situations.

However, even though a tax attorney cannot guarantee results, an attorney can generally help you with the following tax matters.

Understand notices received from the IRS. The IRS has a variety of letters they may send to a taxpayer notifying them about possible issues with their tax return.  Whatever you do when you receive a notice from the IRS, you should not ignore it.  While all notices sent by the IRS do not necessarily mean bad news, you need to read the notice to be sure and attempt to take the steps the IRS is asking of you.  If the IRS does need you to take some form of action, ignoring it will only make the matter worse.  If you do not understand what the notice means, a tax attorney can help you understand the notice and what you need to do.

Address an audit from the IRS. Although a relatively small number of tax returns are audited each year by the IRS—somewhere around 1% of returns filed in a given year—if your return is one of the ones the IRS selects to audit, you need to take action.  A tax attorney can help you work with the IRS to understand the reason for the audit and to be sure any materials you provide to the IRS address the specific need.

File one or more prior tax returns. While most people use a tax preparer or a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) to help them file tax returns, a tax attorney is who you should turn to when you have one or more past due returns.  A tax attorney is the only one who will be able to help you address any legal matters related to the unfiled returns.  An attorney is also the only one who is not legally obligated to tell the IRS everything you have shared with them.

Negotiate a settlement with the IRS for tax owed. Just because you owe money to the IRS, it does not mean that you will have to pay all of it.  Depending on your situation, it may be possible to negotiate a payment arrangement with the IRS to address the tax liability for less than the full amount you actually owe.  A tax attorney will know all the options you have available for addressing your tax owed and how to step through the process and various forms that must be completed to take advantage of each option.

How can I contact a tax attorney to help me with my specific issues?

When you decide that you are ready to get help from a tax attorney, you can do so by completing the short form below.  Completing this form will get you in touch with an actual tax attorney who can discuss your matter with you free of charge.  This discussion is completely confidential and does not obligate you to anything further, so please get help from a tax attorney today so that you can be free of your tax issues soon.

What happens if I never pay my tax liability? What can the IRS do to me?

More than 200 million Americans file their federal income tax returns with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) each year.  But what if you are not among that number?  What will the IRS do if you do not pay your tax liability, or for that matter, if you do not even file your tax return?

The Federal Government of the United States relies on the money paid through income taxes to function, as income taxes paid to the IRS account for funding approximately half of the annual budget of the United States.  Because of the heavy reliance the government places on receiving income taxes, the IRS takes the nonpayment of taxes very seriously.

The IRS starts addressing the nonpayment of tax by assessing a penalty and interest against the tax liability owed.  This is especially true for those who do not file their federal income taxes.  When you do not file your federal income tax, the IRS begins to assess against you a failure to file (FTF) penalty.  The FTF penalty is assessed at the rate of 5% of the amount you owe per month.  For example, after the filing of your tax return is one month late, you will now owe your original tax liability plus an additional 5% of that amount; at the end of the second month, you will owe the original tax liability plus an additional 10%; and so on until the filing of your tax return is five months late at which time you will owe the original tax amount plus 25%.

If you file your federal income tax return but do not pay the tax you owe, the IRS begins to assess a failure to pay (FTP) penalty.  The FTP penalty is only .5% of the amount you owe per month, a much lower penalty.

Therefore, if you owe $1,000 in tax and choose not to file your return, five months later you will owe $1,250 plus interest; but if you file the return and do not pay your tax, five months later you will only owe $1,025 plus interest.

In addition to assessing penalties and interest against you, the IRS will begin to pursue you to collect the unpaid tax liability.  This process will begin with letters and other methods of contacting you to be sure you are aware that you have an unpaid tax liability.  But as time passes and the IRS continues to receive no payment or contact from you being willing to work out some form of payment arrangement, the IRS will escalate the matter, ultimately possibly filing criminal charges against you or obtaining a lien so they can begin to seize your personal property to satisfy the tax liability.

How can I get help with my unpaid federal income taxes or tax returns I have not even filed?

If you need help with a matter related to your federal income taxes, you need to speak with a tax attorney.  A tax attorney is an attorney who has attended law school specifically to learn about addressing tax matters.  Along with this training, such an attorney will have a great deal of experience in dealing with situations similar to yours.

Please complete the short form below, and a tax attorney can review your situation and get in touch with you to speak about the matter.  This initial consultation is free of charge, completely confidential, and does not obligate you to anything further.  Therefore, you have every reason to take advantage of this opportunity by submitting the form to get help with your tax matter today.

What is the statute of limitations for collecting tax debts?

Did you realize that there is a time limit as to how long a creditor can collect a debt that you owe to them?  Whether you owe the debt based on an oral or written agreement, a promissory note, or related to credit card charges, each debt has defined timeframes ranging from as short as 2 years to as long as 15 years that the creditor can collect the debt from you.  This timeframe is known as the statute of limitations.  A statute of limitation also exists for collecting tax debts at the federal level.

In general, the statute of limitation for tax debt owed to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is 10 years from the date when they send a bill to collect the amount owed.  This limitation also applies to a levy placed on your personal property.  This means that when the statute of limitations on the tax debt expires, any levy placed on your property related to that debt likewise expires.

However, there are several events that can lengthen the 10-year statute of limitations for collecting federal taxes due.  These events include the following:

Filing an offer in compromise. An offer in compromise is a proposal by a taxpayer for the IRS to accept less than the full amount owed but still consider the tax liability paid in full.  While the IRS is considering an offer in compromise, the statute of limitations on collecting your tax debt is not running.  The IRS can take up to two years to consider your offer.

Filing bankruptcy. Whether it is a Chapter 7 liquidation or a Chapter 13 reorganization, filing bankruptcy stops the clock on the statute of limitations for tax debt.

Signing an extension waiver. If you have signed other documentation with the IRS agreeing to remain liable for the unpaid tax debt beyond the 10-year statute of limitations, then the timeframe for collecting the debt may be indefinite depending on the wording of the waiver.

If you have unpaid tax debt that is approaching the statute of limitations, keep in mind that they IRS is aware of this timeframe as well.  You should expect that the IRS will escalate their collection attempts as the statute of limitation timeframe approaches.

Also, remember that the 10-year statute of limitations on collecting tax debt applies and other details noted above apply specifically to taxes owed at the federal level to the IRS.  If you owe tax to a state, you need to speak with an attorney to understand the statute of limitations, if any, on your specific tax owed.

How can I get help from a tax attorney with my tax matter?

By completing the short form found below, your information will be provided to a tax attorney who can assist with your matter.  This review will be based on your specific situation.  The review is free of charge, 100% confidential, and does not obligate you to anything further.

Remember that tax laws and the process of working with the IRS on tax matters can be complicated issues.  It is generally a good idea to have a trained tax professional in your corner who understands the way the IRS operates and can give you specific guidance.  Therefore, please take this opportunity to get help with your tax matter today.

How do I know when it is time to hire a tax attorney?

Filing your federal income tax with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) can be a complicated process.  While a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) or other tax preparer can help you calculate and file your tax return, you would need the services of a tax attorney when you encounter some form of legal issue related to your taxes.  Legal issues can arise in a variety of situations related to your federal income tax, including but not limited to some of the following.

You cannot pay your federal income tax due. What happens if you calculate your federal income tax and find that you owe more than you can afford to pay?  The IRS offers options to allow a taxpayer to establish a payment plan or submit an offer in compromise, which is an offer to pay the IRS less than the full amount of tax due.  But the IRS expects you to pay your full tax liability owed; they do not accept a payment plan or an offer in compromise lightly.

To obtain a payment plan or offer in compromise, you must complete specific forms that include a valid reason and sufficient supporting documentation.  The IRS will want to explore with you fully that you have no other method available, such as selling an asset or taking out a loan, to obtain the funds needed to pay your full tax liability.  A tax attorney can help evaluate your tax situation to determine if you may be a candidate for an IRS payment plan or offer in compromise.  An attorney can also help you complete the necessary forms and pull together supporting documentation that is more likely to meet the IRS’ requirements for accepting your proposal.

You have not filed one or more tax returns. If you have not filed your federal income tax for one or more years, it can become a serious legal matter.  The IRS considers tax evasion a serious legal matter.  It is generally in your best interest to take steps to file all of your past due tax returns as soon as you can, because the IRS will file a substitution returns on your behalf that will likely require you to pay more taxes than you would owe on your actual return.  It is also wise to discuss your situation with a tax attorney as well, to be sure you are taking all the appropriate steps you can to minimize the seriousness of the issue.

You are being audited. If you are being audited by the IRS, depending on the nature of the audit, a CPA may be the appropriate person to help prepare additional documentation to support information on your tax return.  But if the audit results in you owing additional tax or uncovers other issues, a tax attorney may be able to help you negotiate a lower settlement for your debt or otherwise addressing the issues.

Subject to criminal tax investigation. In the event you commit some form of tax fraud or serious tax evasion, the IRS can file criminal charges against you.  Criminal charges are never a laughing matter and therefore are not something you should handle on your own without appropriate legal representation.  A tax attorney can help you address criminal charges related to your taxes.

How can I hire a tax attorney who can help with my situation?

If you complete the short form found below, a tax attorney can evaluate your specific situation and get in touch with you to provide an initial consultation free of charge.  This consultation is 100% confidential and does not obligate you to anything further.  But if you are interested in getting in touch with a tax attorney who can help you with your issues, please take this opportunity to complete the form today.

Can the IRS take my retirement accounts because I owe unpaid taxes?

When you calculate your federal income tax, it is not unusual to find that you owe money to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).  Even though they have been taking tax out of your paycheck throughout the year, if the amount withheld was not enough, the amount you owe can be significant.  If you find that you cannot afford to pay the tax liability you owe and you are considering not filing your taxes or not working with the IRS to establish a payment plan, you should be aware that the IRS has powerful authority to collect the tax from you.

The IRS counts on the taxes it collects to fund the federal government.  Therefore, when taxpayers do not pay their fair share, the IRS considers it a serious matter.  The Internal Revenue Code grants the IRS broad powers to place a levy on the assets of a taxpayer who has not paid their taxes and is not willing to work with the IRS to make payments.  An IRS levy gives the IRS authority to seize your assets.

What assets you may be wondering?  Technically, any of your assets are subject to an IRS levy.  This includes your checking and savings accounts, jewelry, family heirlooms, and furniture.  If you are fortunate enough to have luxury items such as a vacation home, a boat, or an expensive sports car, they are fair game for the IRS to seize and sell.  Even your home and retirement accounts can be taken in extreme circumstances.

In the case of retirement accounts, it does not matter whether it is your Social Security benefit, an IRA, your 401k, or your pension.  If it has value, the IRS can seize it to use the funds to pay off your tax liability.

However, even though the IRS technically has the authority to seize any of these assets, it would prefer to establish a payment plan with the IRS.  The IRS will only resort to seizing your property after sending numerous warnings and finding that the taxpayer is avoiding paying the tax and is unwilling to work out a payment arrangement.  Even if the IRS has to seize your property, they will take other assets besides your home and retirement accounts if at all possible, as the IRS understands the difficulty the loss of a home or retirement accounts can cause in someone’s life.

If I foresee issues paying my tax liability, how can I get help?

A tax attorney can provide you help if you have a tax debt that you cannot afford to pay.  Tax attorneys have years of training and experience with situations similar to yours, so they will know what to expect when working with the IRS and can provide advice specific to your tax issues.

If you complete the short form below, a tax attorney will contact you to discuss your situation free of charge.  This initial consultation is completely confidential and does not obligate you to anything further.  But it can be the first step in getting relief from your tax burden, so please take the opportunity to get help today.